The Story of the
Gold Coast, Australia

The Story

Byron Bay 1770

In 1770 the famous seafarer captain James Cook sailed past Australia and named Byron Bay after explorer John Byron, grandfather of poet Lord Byron. Because of the outstanding climate the first agricultures and fisheries were founded. Years later surfers became familiar with the great conditions to surf and since then business has been mainly the cutting and shipment of cedar trees that provided the base for the first surfboards.

Duke Kahanamoku

In 1915 the legendary Duke Kahanamoku, alias “the Duke”, introduced surfing on his 10 ft cedar wooden surfboard in Australia.

A quote from a surfer back then:

“Out through the surf-break “the Duke” paddled, turned around and having paddled onto the face of a breaking wave, caught the wave back into the beach while standing tall on this newly carved cedar surfboard, witnessing the birth of surfing in Australia.”

Byron Bay is nowadays the dream of many surfers. But the Duke’s first ride paved the way…..

Natural Protection

The Aboriginals’ name for Byron Bay is Cavvanba, meaning “meeting place”. These aboriginals found the mineral titanium dioxide in the ground. This natural sunprotector, protects the skin against damaging UVA and UVB radiation. The high breaking index of the crystals give a very strong protection shield. This base was enriched with caring local ingredients, like kukuinut, baobab and monoii.

Byron Bay 1967

This was the most ultimate year for surfers!

The most ultimate wave hit the beaches of Byron Bay in this year. The weather was outstanding, the waves were crazy and the real daredevils had the time of their lifes!

Byron Bay Now

It’s still one of the most popular places to be for surfing, sunbathing and chilling. Byron Bay attracts a colourful mix of people from all over the world. Most backpackers who travel around Australia visit Byron Bay because of its beautiful surroundings and atmosphere.